Greek mound excavators: No tours please, too busy

An excavation in Greece, similar to this one in Persepolis, Iran, has uncovered what appears to be the entrance to an important tomb from about the end of the reign of Alexander the Great. (John Moore, 2014 Getty ImagesHeart )
An excavation in Greece, similar to this one in Persepolis, Iran, has uncovered what appears to be the entrance to an important tomb from about the end of the reign of Alexander the Great. (John Moore, 2014 Getty ImagesHeart )
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Updated: 8/21 7:26 am

ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Archaeologists excavating a large burial mound in northern Greece have asked politicians and others seeking guided tours of the site to leave them in peace.

The Culture Ministry appealed for "understanding" Thursday while the Amphipolis excavation proceeds.

The partially uncovered tomb, from the end of Greek warrior-king Alexander the Great's reign, has captivated the public imagination, fueling wild speculation that it may contain rich treasure and the bones of an ancient celebrity.

Prime Minister Antonis Samaras has already visited the site, and state TV daily leads news bulletins with incremental developments in the ongoing excavation.

So far, archaeologists have uncovered part of the late 4th Century BC tomb's entrance with two large stone sphinxes.

Alexander built an empire reaching from Greece to India and was buried in Egypt.

 

©2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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